Followup to Atmospheric Scattering—Part 1

This post is the first in a series to fol­low-​up on my 2012 GPU Pro 3 arti­cle about atmos­pher­ic scat­ter­ing [11]. What I showed there was a full sin­gle-​scat­ter­ing solu­tion for a plan­e­tary atmos­phere run­ning in a pix­el shad­er, dynam­ic and in real time, with­out pre-​com­pu­ta­tion or sim­pli­fy­ing assump­tions. The key to this achieve­ment was a nov­el and effi­cient way to eval­u­ate the Chap­man func­tion [2], hence the title. In the time since then I have improved on the algo­rithm and extend­ed it to include aspects of mul­ti­ple scat­ter­ing. The lat­ter caus­es hor­i­zon­tal dif­fu­sion (twi­light sit­u­a­tions) and ver­ti­cal dif­fu­sion (deep atmos­pheres), and nei­ther can be ignored for a gen­er­al atmos­phere ren­der­er in a space game, for exam­ple.

I have writ­ten a Shader­toy that reflects the cur­rent state of affairs. It’s a mini flight sim­u­la­tor that also fea­tures clouds, and oth­er ren­der­ing good­ies. A WebGL2 capa­ble brows­er is need­ed to run it. Under Win­dows, the ANGLE/Direct3D trans­la­tor may take a long time to com­pile it (up to a minute is noth­ing unusu­al, but it runs fast after­wards). When suc­cess­ful­ly com­piled it should look like this:
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